1101 Standiford Ave Ste B3Modesto, CA 95350209-526-9447

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Posts for: August, 2014

CompositeResinsareaViableRestorationOptionforMildlyDefectiveTeeth

No matter how damaged or decayed your teeth may have become, there’s a restorative solution for it. From porcelain veneers that cover unattractive teeth to dental implants that permanently replace missing teeth, we have the means to give you back a beautiful, life-like smile.

But what if the problems with your teeth are relatively mild — a chipped tooth or a cavity in a highly visible place? Porcelain veneers and bridgework involve extensive tooth preparation that permanently alters the tooth. Is there a less intrusive option that still results in a life-like restoration?

The answer is yes. Composite resins are tooth-colored materials that are bonded directly to tooth surfaces. Made of a plastic-based material matrix with inorganic glass-like filler, composite resins require very little tooth preparation and are often applied in a single visit.

They’re an excellent way to address imperfections or defects with an otherwise healthy tooth, while still preserving the majority of its remaining structure. In the hands of a skilled dentist, composite resins can be used to fill, repair and reshape teeth. They’re also an ideal choice for younger patients whose dental arches are still in development — restorations that require extensive tooth preparation might compromise the tooth’s long-term health. A composite resin treatment could serve as a transitional bridge until a more extensive restoration can be performed after the patient’s mouth structure has fully matured.

Composite resins do have some disadvantages. Because the resin material isn’t as strong as the tooth structure it replaces (although there have been great improvements in the last few years in resin strength), it may not stand up to biting pressures over time if there isn’t enough remaining tooth structure available to support it. They material can also dull and stain with use.

Still, for moderate imperfections or as an interim solution until another restoration can be undertaken, composite resins are a good choice.

If you would like more information on restorations with composite resin, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth with Composite Resin.”


By David F. Woodill, DDS
August 13, 2014
Category: Oral Health
ChristieBrinkleysAll-AmericanSmile

Model Christie Brinkley's smile has been a symbol of America's optimism since the seventies. Particularly well known for being the cover model for three consecutive Sports Illustrated Swimsuit editions, Brinkley still has a fresh-faced American girl-next-door beauty that starts with her cheerful smile, which transmits the message that all is well.

Brinkley's modeling career began when she was “discovered” in Paris in the seventies, at the age of 18. As she explained in an interview with Dear Doctor magazine, it was like a fairy tale. She had gone to study art in Paris, where a fashion designer spotted her walking down the street. “He told me later he immediately thought, ‘That's the girl!’” she said.

Brinkley attributes her famous smile to a combination of good genetics (she inherited her mother's “beautiful straight teeth”), combined with the intelligence to practice good oral hygiene and have regular dental appointments. She never needed to have work done to prepare her for the modeling life; but as a teenager, she said, she wished she could wear braces because she thought the “coolest kids had them.”

Although dental restorations were not needed to enhance her beautiful natural smile, she did have two dental implants after she fractured two rear molars in a bad helicopter crash while back-country skiing, and she says she is thankful for dental implant technology because it looks and feels so natural.

Brinkley said that her smile led directly to her assignment as spokesperson for a brand of oral rinse and mouthwash products. She is also concerned about the environment. Her company Christie, Inc. is designing environmentally friendly products.

Her advice to everyone is to smile more. “I think a smile makes EVERYONE beautiful! It's the greatest gift we give each other... It's an expression of friendship, love and peace!”

If you have questions about your smile, contact us today to schedule an appointment. Or you can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Christie Brinkley's Supermodel Smile.”


By David F. Woodill, DDS
August 01, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
PreservingorRestoringTeeth-BothPathsLeadtoBetterOralHealth

A wise man once said, “No man is an island.” Something similar could be said about our teeth — their health and vitality are intricately linked with a person’s general health. Missing teeth in particular can set off a chain reaction that leads to bone loss, an issue for both your health and appearance.

Bone is composed of living cells that go through normal cycles of growth and resorption (the dissolving of mineral composition in the bone). In our early years, there’s more growth than resorption as our skeletal structure develops; in adulthood the cycle tends to equalize between the two phases. In our later years, the cycle tends more toward resorption.

The action of biting and chewing actually helps keep the cycle on track as the generated forces stimulate bone growth. When teeth are missing, though, the bone no longer receives this stimulation and will resorb at a higher rate. This is especially a concern for people who’ve suffered a complete loss of their teeth.

This bone loss may in turn trigger a number of related problems. The jaws may no longer close properly, leading to painful stress in the joints. Nutrition suffers as food choices become limited due to the lack of teeth and bite problems. And, a person’s appearance may change as well — the bone loss shortens the look of the face and causes the person to appear much older than they are.

Because of these potential problems, we should do everything we can to preserve and prolong natural teeth. But if preservation isn’t an option, then some form of restoration should be pursued. Dental implants in particular may actually prevent and even reverse bone loss. Bone has an affinity with titanium (which is what the implant is made from) and will attach and grow around it over time. This not only anchors the implant, it also increases bone mass where it may have been prematurely lost.

Caring for and preserving your natural teeth is one of the best things you can do for the health of your jawbone. If you lose your teeth, though, there are ways to restore them and protect bone health — and your smile — at the same time.

If you would like more information on the effects of tooth loss, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “New Teeth in One Day.”




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