1101 Standiford Ave Ste B3Modesto, CA 95350209-526-9447

My Blog

Posts for: July, 2012

By David F. Woodill, DDS
July 30, 2012
Category: Oral Health
CatCoras6WaystoKeepKidsOffJunkFood

Junk food and between-meal sweets are a habit for many of us, even though we know it is bad for our bodies and our teeth. As adults, we are responsible for our own choices. As parents, we are also responsible for our children's choices, and for teaching them to choose wisely.

Celebrity Chef Cat Cora offers the following six suggestions for leading children to a healthy lifestyle. Cora is a star of Iron Chef America and author of Cat Cora's Classics with a Twist: Fresh Takes on Favorite Dishes, in which she reveals healthier versions of classic recipes. In her remakes she shows how to cook with a lot of flavor while reducing fat and sugar. Cora has four young sons, so her methods are not just theories — they have been practiced in real life.

1. Remember who's the boss.

“My kids have never had fast food,” Cora said in a recent interview with Dear Doctor magazine. “The parents have a choice to do that or not,” she said. “The kids are not going to the grocery store to shop; the kids are not driving themselves through fast food chains.”

2. Make your rules clear and stick to them.

“Right now my 7-year-old tries to be picky, but it's really about us being consistent as parents,” Cat said. For example, in her household pizza is served only at the weekly pizza and movie night. The kids get a healthier version of what they want, so they don't feel deprived. The evening includes air-popped popcorn without butter — and no soda, which is bad for teeth because of its sugar and other chemical ingredients.

3. Offer your children a variety of foods and tastes.

Cora made sure her children tried different foods and spices from infancy, so they are open to trying new things. It's easier to get all the nutrition you need if you eat a wide variety of foods.

4. Learn to make tasty substitutions for sugar.

When her children were babies, Cora stopped relying on bottles and sippy cups as soon as possible, reducing her children's likelihood of developing tooth decay due to sugary residues remaining in their mouths. Now that they are older, she uses tasty substitutes for sugar such as fruit purees and the natural sugar substitute Stevia.

5. Include the children in meal planning.

Kids are more likely to eat a meal they are involved in planning and cooking. For example, ask them which vegetable they would like to have (not whether they want to have a vegetable).

6. Model healthy behavior for your kids.

Parents are the best role models. This is true not only for food choices, but also for exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about oral health. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cat Cora.”


By David F. Woodill, DDS
July 15, 2012
Category: Oral Health
CanAnythingBeDoneAboutMySnoring

Sleeping disorders impact people in different ways. For some people, they may feel they do not have a problem — except for the fact that their sleeping partner complains about their snoring. For others, they may know they have a snoring issue because they constantly wake themselves up gasping for air. This is a dangerous condition known as Obstructive Sleep Apnea OSA (“a” – without; “pnea” – breath). If any of these scenarios sound like your experience, then you may have OSA or another type of Sleep Related Breathing Disorder (SRBD). However, before jumping to conclusions, you need to obtain a thorough examination from a primary-care physician who is trained in sleep medicine in conjunction with our office. We have received training in the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. But the good news is that sleep apnea is a treatable condition.

As for your question, yes, there are many things we can do to treat your snoring after the cause of your problem is properly established. One helpful approach is through the use of a specially designed oral appliance that we custom make and fit to your mouth. It is easy to use during sleep. Once in place, it will keep your lower jaw in a forward position so that your tongue is held forward to stop blocking your upper airway (i.e. the back of your throat and area causing your snoring and hindering your breathing while you sleep). Another option is to use a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. This specialized machine requires you to sleep with a mask that covers your mouth and/or nose. While you sleep, it delivers continuous pressure to your windpipe so that your tongue is forced away from your airway.

If your snoring is keeping you or your loved ones awake, we are a good place to start. Contact us today to discuss your questions about snoring or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more about snoring and sleep disorders when you continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sleep Disorders & Dentistry.”




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